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Health and Safety Downloads

Competence to Operate Construction Plan - CPA

The guide, ‘Competence to Operate Construction Plant’ was produced with the backing of the Strategic Forum Plant Safety Group. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) were also involved in its production.

It sets out to clarify methods for employers to manage, develop and record employees' competences to operate all types of plant, including mobile elevated work platforms (MEWPs). It
sets out a four-stage process for managing operators’ competence: selection, training and assessment, developing competence and life-long learning.

Download (PDF 555K)

Pre-use inspections

Pre Inspection - Safety Poster

A programme of daily visual and functional checks, regular inspections and servicing schedules should be established in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and the risks associated with each MEWP.

Operators should be encouraged to report defects or problems. Reported problems should be put right quickly and the MEWP taken out of service if the item is safety critical.

The MEWP must be thoroughly examined at least every six months by a competent person or in accordance with an examination scheme drawn up by such a competent person.

Download (PDF 1.8MB)

Give yourself a helping hand...


Trapped fingers, cuts from sharp objects, skin conditions, sprains strains; Handling can cause all sorts of injuries

3 in 10 workplace injuries are caused by poor handling practices, but following these dos and don’ts will help minimise your risk

Do
- Carry out a thorough risk assessment
- Avoid direct handling of sharp edged items
- Remove sharp edges or cover them up
- Use personal protective equipment (PPE) such as thumb guards

Don’t
- Think wearing gloves will solve the problem. They post a major entanglement risk when using machinery, and can make it difficult to work.
- Use the wrong PPE. Make sure the protective equipment you use on your hands is resistant to any chemicals you are exposed to
- Assume you know the best way to approach handling – get training!

Download (PDF 1.79MB)

This safety poster reminds operators that they must be trained and familiar with the equipment they are using.

Operators must:

• be competent to operate the MEWP in the working conditions to which they are exposed,

• be instructed in local hazards and site rules,

• have attended a recognised basic training course, and

• be familiar with the make and model of MEWP they are authorised to operate.

Download (PDF 1.73MB)

Don't Over-Reach Safety Poster

New poster warns ladder users to keep safety in mind.

Don’t over-reach and always:
Keep your body centred within the ladder
Keep three points of contact with the ladder
Keep the rungs clean and in good condition
Make sure the rungs are horizontal
Position the ladder correctly on a firm, level surface
Check the feet of the ladder daily
Fasten the ladder at top and bottom
Use the 1 in 4 rule for leaning ladders
Do not exceed the maximum weight limit on the ladder
Only carry light materials or tools (up to 10kg)

Download (PDF 6MB)

Work at height safety poster

Slips and Trips: New poster explains the risks
They may seem innocuous – even funny -, but slips and trips are the most common type of workplace accident, and account for a third of all major injuries.

Over 10,000 workers suffered a serious injury because of a slip or trip last year.

Prevention is better than cure, and one of the best ways of preventing accidents is making sure that people are aware of the risks. That’s why our poster this month shows our hapless health and safety character falling flat on his back because of a spillage that hasn’t been cleaned up properly.

Help raise awareness in your workplace by downloading a copy of ths work at height safety poster

Download (PDF 1.53MB)

New poster warns of the dangers of working on fragile roofs

A new poster created by Facelift highlights the dangers of working on fragile roofs, or above skylights. Showing the poster series’ familiar safety character falling face first through a skylight to the ground, the poster clearly demonstrates the importance of proper risk assessments and safety precautions when working at height.

Download (PDF 1.96MB)

This safety poster highlights the need to consider ground condition when operating MEWPs. Ground conditions can be affected by weather, with rain and temperature, - and structure, including under ground voids, drainage and sewers, basements, man hole covers. The weight of the vehicle must also be considered, as this can damage surfaces, paving slabs and tiles.

Download (PDF 1.84MB)

Guidance notes and application for a licence to assemble and use a mobile tower on the highway

Guidance notes and application for a
licence to assemble and use a mobile
tower on the highway

Download (PDF 707K)

The 5th work at height safety poster in the series looks at the risks of high wind conditions.

Wind and weather - All MEWPs have a manufacturers recommended wind tolerance.

The most commonly quoted wind tolerance is force six which is a strong breeze 28 to 31 mph or 12.5 metres per second, however some MEWPs will have no wind tolerance because they are designed for indoor use only. Always check the recommended wind speed for the machine you are using. This information can be found in the operators manual
and it should also be on a decal (information sticker) on the machine.

Designed wind speeds are based on three second gusts, more exposure could cause the machine to become unstable. Wind speed should be checked at the working height by means of a hand held wind meter (anemometer) which is the only method considered reliable.

Download (PDF 1.95MB)

This poster is about the risk of entrapment.

Unfortunately over the past few years a number of accidents involving the use of MEWPs have occurred, including tragically fatalities. Some of these incidents have involved the operator or other person being crushed against fixtures or other obstacles while working at height. Too often this has occurred when a job is being rushed and normal safety and risk assessment procedures have been compromised.

The poster is a reminder to be aware of overhead obstacles and other potential risks.

Download (PDF 1.73MB)

Work at height safety posters - 03

When working near power cables and with the boom fully extended, the safe recommended working distance is 9 metres from wooden poles, and 15 metres from steel pylons.

Operatives also need to remember that high winds can cause cables to sway in your direction, meaning that you may not be as far away from power cables as originally intended and constant vigilance is required.

Download (PDF 1.96MB)

Facelift has just launched the latest in its new range of retro safety posters, this time with a ‘Be Seen’ theme. The poster was designed to show the importance of wearing hi-viz, especially in the winter months and on busy sites with heavy traffic.

Download (PDF 1.76MB)

Work at Height Safety Posters

Collect these Free Work at Height Safety posters. We'll be publishing one every month this year. The first WAH safety poster in the series reminds us to make sure our harness is attached to the cage - working at height is as safe as working on the ground as long as you are properly trained and follow the required safety procedures. The posters are inspired by the classic safety posters of the past, and are designed to have a simple memorable message. The posters feature powerful illustrations by London based illustrator Stephen Harnwell Jones.

Download (PDF 1.94MB)

Bronto S50XDT-J Poster

The poster shows the machine effortlessly demonstrating its impressive reach as it is used to carry out repair work at a Carthusian monastery in West Sussex.

With a unique three section super-jib cage boom and an up and over reach of 16m at 33m height, the Bronto has a maximum working outreach of 35m and a down reach of 10m

Download (PDF 571K)

Working safely on roofs

Working on roofs is a high-risk activity because it involves working at height. Roofers make up nearly a quarter of all workers killed in falls from height at work. Falls through fragile materials, such as roof lights and asbestos cement roofing sheets, account for more of these deaths than any other single cause. Not all those who are killed while working on roofs are trained roofers: many people accessing roofs are maintenance workers. There are also many serious injuries, often resulting in permanent disabilities.

Download (PDF 6.58MB)

HSE Fee Intervention Guide

HSE proposes to introduce a fee for intervention cost recovery scheme with effect from 1 October 2012, subject to Parliamentary approval of the proposed Health and Safety (Fees) Regulations 2012.

These Regulations will put a duty on HSE to recover its costs for carrying out its regulatory functions from those found to be in material breach of health and safety law.

Download (PDF 388K)

Facelift Access Hire - Liverpool
Unit 6, Capitol Trading Park,
Kirkby Bank Road
Knowsley Industrial Estate
L33 7SY

If you have any questions regards our move please contact Liverpool Depot Manager Ewan Smith

0151 207 2071
0151 207 2073 (fax)
07740 023 097
esmith@facelift.co.uk

Download (PDF 214K)

Facelift IPAF PAL+ leaflet

PAL+ is an optional, additional one day of category-specific training aimed at operators working in higher risk or challenging environments.

IPAF’s well-recognised PAL operator course is certified by TÜV as conforming to the international standard ISO 18878 and about 100,000 people are trained each year. The PAL operator course meets all requirements for basic operator training.

Download (700k)

The lowering of mobile elevated working platforms in an emergency

The lowering of mobile elevated working platforms in an emergency

Lessons learned following a fatality on a non-London 2012 project involving a mobile elevated working platform (MEWP) resulted in an emergency drill being carried out on the Olympic Park. It was found that not enough of the workforce knew how to lower a MEWP in an emergency.

Further training of operatives was recommended to mitigate this health and safety risk.

Download (PDF 1.12MB)

HSE RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences) has changed its reporting process.

The point of reporting injuries has now increased from over three days, to over seven days’ incapacitation, (excluding the day on which the accident occurred). Incapacitation signifies that the employee is absent, or unable to carry out the work that they would ordinarily be expected to do.

Download (PDF 105K)

Health and safety generates polarised views. Some see health and safety regulation as key to preventing injury and ill health; others see it as a burden on business, driving risk aversion and undermining our collective sense of responsibility. Over the past year health and safety regulation has been under scrutiny from the government and the press have frequently highlighted misapplication of these regulations.

Download (PDF 285K)

HSE report on occupational health provision during the London 2012 Olympics

The HSE has published a report on a research project focussed on the occupational health (OH) provision at the Olympic Park and Athletes' Village. The OH service was set up by The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), to show its commitment to the health and safety of all contractors at the Olympics.

Download (PDF 953K)

Ladder Book from The Ladder Association

Ladder Book from The Ladder Association

Download (PDF 1.48MB)

City of London Code of Practice On the Design and Installation of Suspended and Facade Access Equipment in London

This code of practice designed by The City of London is intended to be a useful guide for duty-holders, designers, manufacturers, suppliers and
installers - who have specific duties under health and safety legislation with regards to SFAE. This is a pilot version.

Download (PDF 74K)

Health and Safety Executive Safe Maintenance Campaign

This poster is for the Health and Safety Executive's Safe Maintenance Campaign. in partnership with the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), the EEF and the TUC.
This Europe wide campaign promotes a safe and healthy workplace - through encouraging an in depth and structured approach to maintenance. Maintenance affects each area of health and safety. A large number of accidents and diseases are caused by poor standards and a failure to keep the work environment in a good condition.

Download (PDF 559K)

Ladder Safety

This poster is for the Health and Safety Executive's Safe Maintenance Campaign. in partnership with the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), the EEF and the TUC.
This Europe wide campaign promotes a safe and healthy workplace - through encouraging an in depth and structured approach to maintenance. Maintenance affects each area of health and safety. A large number of accidents and diseases are caused by poor standards and a failure to keep the work environment in a good condition.

Download (PDF 604K)

Demolition - Do's and Dont's Guide

This booklet has been produced as a guide in identifying potential hazards and adopting good practices by all involved in the demolition process.

The people who most benefit from this guide will include; site supervisors, operatives and especially
new starters.

Download (PDF 543K)

Reviewing health and safety legislation

In March 2011, the Government established an Independent Review of Health and Safety legislation to make proposals for simplifying the existing raft of health and safety legislation. This review was chaired by leading risk management specialist Professor Ragnar Löfstedt.

The Löfstedt Report and the Government response

We published Professor Löfstedt's report "Reclaiming health and safety for all: An independent review of health and safety regulation" on 28 November 2011.

Professor Löfstedt's report sets out a number of risk- and evidence-based recommendations that will:

reduce regulatory requirements on business where they do not lead to improved health and safety outcomes, and
remove pressures on business to go beyond what the regulations require, enabling them to reclaim ownership of the management of health and safety.

Download (PDF 781K)

HEMSA IPAF TRAINING

HEMSA is the Highway Electrical Manufacturers and Suppliers Association, and provides a professional organisation for manufacturers and distributors and gives confidence to local authorities that its members can provide quality products and services at a competitive price.

HEMSA was formed in November 1998 with the main purpose of securing the interests of its members by the exchange of knowledge and information and to promote standards of quality and service. HEMSA organise and host meaningful and topical seminars at a variety of venues up and down the country. They are complemented by exciting and vibrant exhibitions keeping key decision makers in the industry fully informed and up to date with product developments.

Download (PDF 2.58MB)

PASMA Training

PASMA Training Course, fall protection review - A wide-ranging review of PASMA's recommended best practice for the avoidance of falls from height from mobile access towers has been conducted by PASMA in collaboration with the Health & Safety Executive.

Download (PDF 2.29MB)

Spread the load poster

What is 'Spread the load'?

IPAF has launched a safety campaign calling for the proper assessment of ground conditions and the correct use of stabilisers, outriggers and spreader plates.

IPAF’s “Spread the load!” campaign is built around this simple and straightforward message:

Spreader plates should always be used with boom-type mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs) when fully supported on their outriggers.
Spreader plates should be used with all other MEWPs that have outriggers unless a risk assessment indicates they are not necessary.

The campaign is an initiative from the IPAF UK Hire Committee’s Spreader Plates Sub-Group. Several campaign tools, available in different languages, have been developed to spread the message, including leaflets, posters, stickers and a video.

Why is this campaign needed?

MEWPs are generally very safe and stable. However, incorrect set-up can cause instability and lead to overturning. This is often the result of inadequate ground assessment, poor selection of spreader plates, or incorrect positioning of outriggers. The ‘Spread the load!’ campaign sets out to give clear and practical guidance on when and how to use spreader plates.

Download (PDF 1.28MB)

HSE Newsletter 2011

Health & Safety Newsletter

Now available at a screen near you…the new-look Health & Safety Newsletter.

All the latest HSE news, case studies, court stories, and guidance is now available to everyone free of charge - and it's all just a click away.

Download (PDF 2.05MB)

Consulting employees on health and safety - a brief guide to the law

This leaflet provides an overview of employers’ duties to consult with their employees or their representatives on health and safety matters.

Download (PDF 137K)

HSE_Work_Place_Poster

HSE Work Place Poster

Workplaces where employees play an active part in health and safety have lower accident rates. Collaboration with your employees helps you to manage health and safety in a practical way

Download (pdf)

PASMA 2011 Review

PASMA
is the natural focus
and authority for the
mobile access tower
industry in the UK
and Ireland. A leading
trade association in the
work at height sector,
it provides advice,
guidance and support
to its many members
and the industry
at large

Download (PDF 4.38MB)

FEM Position paper on the use of cranes to lift people

Mobile cranes shall never be used for entertainment purposes, e.g. lifting of persons for shows, bungee jumping, dinner-in-the-sky or lifting of other structures with people on the structure or underneath (e.g. lifting of tents)!

Mobile cranes are not intended to lift persons; they may be used to hoist and suspend personnel in man baskets only in unique work situations when it is the least hazardous way to do the job. Platforms fixed to crane booms for lifting of persons are not included herewith, as they are covered by international standards for mobile elevated work platforms.

Download (pdf)

Avoiding falls from Vehicles

Where are the risks?
Many falls from vehicles occur during loading and unloading - you don’t have to fall far to land hard.

Fall-from-vehicle incidents can cost your company a lot of money. In 2004/05, the human and economic cost of the fall from- vehicle incidents we know about was over £36.5 million.

Falls from vehicles often result in serious injuries that keep skilled people, such as lorry drivers, off work for many weeks; agency workers might have to be employed to ‘fill in’, and deliveries may be delayed. More than 75% of major fall-from-vehicle incidents occur during loading and unloading activities. Fall prevention must be an integral part of planning loading and unloading and selecting the right kind of vehicle is an important part of this.

Download (pdf)

Preventing slips trips and falls from vehicles

If you specify delivery vehicles, oversee their
maintenance, or manage operations involving the
loading/unloading of goods, this information may help
you understand why people fall from these kinds of
vehicles and how these falls can be prevented.

Download (pdf)

6 easy steps to more fuel efficient driving

There are 6 easy ways to adjust your driving, and how you maintain your vehicle, that will improve you fuel efficiency and save you money.

Download (PDF)

Access Platform Guide 2011

Click to download a copy of our access guide. With over 60 different powered platforms and information on our IPAF and PASMA training courses.

Download (7.5Mb)

IPAF MEWPs Categories Poster

The IPAF training programme adopted new MEWPs categories from 1 January 2008. These category changes do not affect the training received and existing PAL Cards (Powered Access Licences) remain valid as specified. Existing PAL Card holders do not need to get their cards changed.

The new IPAF categories, with abbreviations and brief explanations, are:

Static Vertical (1a): Vertical personnel platforms (static)

Static Boom (1b): Self-propelled booms (outriggers), trailers/push-arounds, vehicle-mounted platforms

Mobile Vertical (3a): Scissor lifts, vertical personnel platforms (mobile)

Mobile Boom (3b): Self-propelled booms

Push Around Vertical (PAV): Push around verticals

Special (SPECIAL): Specialist machines

The following courses continue unchanged:
• Mast Climbing Work Platforms (MCWP)
• Insulated Aerial Devices (IAD)
• Telehandler Platforms – Integrated (TPI)
• Harness Use and Inspection (H)
• Loading and Unloading (LOAD)
• MEWPs for Managers (MM)

Current PAL Card holders who need to replace lost cards will be issued duplicate cards with the original categories they have been trained in. This is because the categories listed on the PAL Card reflect the training received. Those who re-train or do upgrades from 1 January 2008 onwards will be issued with the new categories.

Site managers can check the validity of PAL Cards by calling the IPAF office.

Download (PDF 1.5Mb)

Managing health and safety in construction

Managing health and safety in construction

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007

Approved Code of Practice

Download (PDF 846K)

CDM Red, amber and green lists

CDM Red, amber and green lists

Red, amber and green lists are practical aides to designers on what to eliminate/avoid, and what to encourage.

Download (PDF 46K)

SAFETY NOTICE FOR OPERATORS - Issued by Construction Plant-hire Association

STRATEGIC FORUM PLANT SAFETY GROUP

SAFETY NOTICE FOR OPERATORS - 16/11/09

Issued by Construction Plant-hire Association for the Strategic Forum Plant Safety Group

SAFETY NOTICE: Ten points you should be aware of now.

Download (PDF 133K)

Safe Use of Quick Hitches on Excavators

Safe Use of Quick Hitches on Excavators.

Every year, the construction industry is responsible for causing deaths and serious
injury. The industry has done much to improve its performance which I welcome,
but there is still room for improvement. Our industry is innovative and is constantly
evolving new equipment and processes to increase efficiency. This has consequences
for site management who must ensure that operators are competent, capable of
operating equipment safely and are following safe working procedures.
A quick hitch (also known as a quick coupler) saves time and makes an excavator a far
more versatile piece of construction equipment. When used safely, quick hitches
reduce the risk of injuries through manual handling and crushing during the bucket
changing process, whilst also giving benefits in improved productivity.

Download (PDF 495K)

The absolutely essential Health and Saftey Toolkit

The absolutely essential Health and Saftey Toolkit

This toolkit provides a ready checklist for health and safety problems on small construction sites. It will help you to manage or avoid them and to ensure your own health and safety as well as the health and safety of the people who work for you, your clients, and others such as the public. The toolkit also acts as a signpost to more detailed advice.
While substantial improvements have been made in construction health and safety since the 2001 Construction Summit, it is sadly the case that every week one person is killed on a construction site and many more are injured or suffer health problems. Twice as many workers are made ill by work than are injured. Each death is one too many and simple measures can prevent them.
Make use of this toolkit. If we all work together we can make the construction industry a healthier and safer place to work in.

Download (PDF 608Kb)

Health and safety in construction.

Health and safety in construction.

This is the third edition of Health and safety in construction. It has been updated and expanded in the light of new legislation, in particular the Work at Height Regulations 2005. It also features new information on recent advances and examples of good practice in the construction industry.
This book is aimed at the small contractor but also applies to everyone involved in construction. It provides help and assistance on how to work safely on most tasks you will encounter. It will also help to identify the main causes of accidents and ill health and explains how to eliminate hazards and control risks. The guidance is simple but comprehensive. The solutions are straightforward and easy to adopt.

Download (PDF 3.61Mb)

More than half of serious fall injuries, such as fractured skulls, broken bones and severe cuts, are caused by falling from below head height.

Download (PDF 119K)

More than half of serious fall injuries, such as fractured skulls, broken bones and severe cuts, are caused by falling from below head height.

Download (PDF 58K)

This information will help you identify when you, or
people you are responsible for, are working at height and the issues you need to think about.

Download (PDF 119K)

This document is written for employers, the self-employed and anyone who works at height. It tells you what you need to do to comply with the Work at Height Regulations 2005, as amended by the Work at Height (Amendment) Regulations 2007. The Regulations apply to all work at height where there is a risk of a fall liable to cause personal injury.

Download (PDF 94K)

If you need to do minor maintenance work on a roof, this information will help you plan a safe method of work.

Download (PDF 103K)

This document is written for employers, the self-employed and anyone who works at height. It tells you what you need to do to comply with the Work at Height Regulations 2005, as amended by the Work at Height (Amendment) Regulations 2007. The Regulations apply to all work at height where there is a risk of a fall liable to cause personal injury.

Download (PDF 94K)

HSE - Minor roof maintenance work: Protecting against falls.
What is it?
Minor roof maintenance work is a task which:
¦ can be completed in a matter of minutes, not hours;
¦ is infrequent;
¦ only needs one or two people;
¦ does not involve difficult work (eg heavy or awkward
loads); and
¦ only involves a small area.
For example, replacing a couple of roof slates.
Working from roofs is specialised work and should only be done
by competent people, using a method of work specific to the job,
with appropriate supervision and monitoring. Other types of roof
work, which take longer, are larger in scale or more difficult need
to have higher standards of fall protection, eg suitable scaffolding

Download (PDF, 102KB)

PPE

HSE - Selecting, using and maintaining personal fall protection equipment.
What is personal fall
protection equipment?
There are several types of personal fall protection systems
and equipment. Users of these systems require high levels of
training and appropriate close supervision:
¦ work restraint systems and equipment will include a
lanyard which must be adjusted, or set, to a fixed length
to prevent the user physically getting to a place where
they could fall, eg a roof edge or fragile surface;
¦ work positioning systems and equipment enable the
user to work in tension or suspension to prevent or limit
a fall, eg a boatswain’s chair or linesman. A back-up
system is needed in case the main support fails;
¦ rope access systems use two ropes, a working rope
and a safety rope, each secured to a reliable anchor.
The user’s harness is attached to both ropes in such a
way they can get to and from the work area and the risk
of falling is prevented or limited. This type of system
could be used to access the side of a tall building where
a cradle cannot be used;
¦ fall arrest systems and equipment limit the impact force
of a fall on the user and prevent them hitting the ground.
The anchor point should be as high as possible above
the feet of the user to limit the distance of the fall.
Equipment should be regularly inspected for wear and
damage.

Download (PDF, 108KB)

Selecting competent contractors for work at height

HSE - Selecting competent contractors for work at height.
Are you responsible for maintaining a building or a piece of
plant? Does this involve the need to work at height? Tasks
might include gutter cleaning, painting, roof repairs, or
servicing plant and electrical equipment. If you are, you need
to make sure any contractors you use for this work are
competent to work at height.
Selecting contractors
Identify the work that needs to be done. This will help you
decide the sort of contractor you need and the type of
competence you will expect them to have.
Ask the following questions to help you decide if the
contractor is competent to do the work you need them to do.

Download (PDF, 93KB)

HSE - Selecting equipment for work at height

Selecting equipment for work at height.
What factors do you
need to consider?
Working conditions
When deciding which type of equipment is most suitable for
a particular task, consider the following:
¦ slopes or poor ground conditions;
¦ obstructions, eg steelwork or overhangs;
¦ fragile surfaces;
¦ floor loading.
Distance to be climbed
Portable ladders are less suitable for higher climbs,
particularly if loads are carried. Where possible, provide
temporary stairs or scaffold access towers with internal
stairs, rather than portable ladders.
Duration and frequency of use
Longer duration or regular jobs generally justify a better
standard of fall protection, eg a tower scaffold, podium step or
cherry picker rather than a ladder or stepladder. A ladder or
stepladder may be acceptable for short duration tasks, eg
replacing a light bulb when building a tower or podium would
not be reasonable because the task itself takes only a few
seconds to do. But, installing several rows of light bulbs or
fluorescent strips in a false ceiling refurbishment may justify the
use of a tower or podium steps because the task takes longer.

Download (PDF, 118 KB)

Work at height: The basics

Work at height means work in any place where, if
precautions were not taken, a person could fall down and
injure themselves.
If you:
¦ work above ground level;
¦ could fall from an edge, through an opening or fragile
surface; or
¦ could fall from ground level into an opening in a floor or
hole in the ground;
you will be working at height, because you can fall from one
level to another.

Download (PDF, 119 KB)

Selecting the right mewp for the job

This information sheet is aimed at those responsible for selecting, specifying and managing mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs) on site and should be read alongside Preventing falls from boomtype mobile elevating work platforms.1
It tells you what you should consider before selecting a MEWP to gain access to work at height and the risks that need to be managed while the MEWP is in use.
All types of MEWPs are covered by this guidance, including ones that are:
¦
vertical ‘scissor’ lift;
¦
selfpropelled
boom;
¦
vehiclemounted
boom; and
¦
trailermounted
boom.

This information sheet has been produced in consultation with the International Powered Access Federation Ltd (IPAF), the Construction Planthire
Association and the British Constructional Steelwork Association.

Download (PDF 259K)

MEWPS Working on roofs

Working on a roof can be dangerous. Falls account for more deaths and serious injuries in construction than anything else and roofers account for 24% – the biggest category of worker by far – of those people who are killed in all falls from height.

Any fall from a roof inevitably involves at least a serious injury. The risks are substantial, however long or short the work. Many have been killed who only meant to be on the roof for a few minutes ‘to have a quick look’ or to carry out a small repair.

This leaflet is aimed at people who actually carry out roof work or are directly responsible for managing or supervising it. It sets out key safeguards, but more detailed information is contained in Health and safety in roof work HSG33.
Falls occur:
¦
from the edges of roofs;
¦
through gaps or holes in roofs; and
¦
through fragile roof materials and roof lights.
In addition, many people have been seriously injured by material falling or thrown from roofs.

Download (PDF 287K)

Selecting competent contractors for working at height

Selecting competent contractors for working at height

The more complex and potentially dangerous the activities, the more likely it is that the answers and information will need to be recorded.

As the client, you will be responsible for checking that any contractor you appoint is competent to do the work safely. Work which involves greater risks, eg work on roofs, will need more thorough checks to ensure that the contractor has the necessary skills and knowledge. Once you have selected a competent contractor, you will need to exchange information and agree the method of work.
Both will need to be done before work starts. Pre-work meetings are a good way of ensuring that the work is properly planned and controlled. Finally, you will also need to monitor the work.

Download (PDF 94K)

Scaffold tower training - PASMA Courses

This information sheet is aimed at users of mobile access towers (also known as tower scaffolds or towers). It will also help those who select and specify such equipment.

The Work at Height Regulations 2005 require an assessment to be undertaken before starting any work at height. If the assessment confirms that there is no alternative to working at height, then suitable work equipment should be selected, taking into account the nature of the work.

Mobile access towers are widely used and can provide an effective and safe means of gaining access to work at height. However, inappropriate erection and misuse of towers are the cause of numerous accidents each year. Aluminium and thin-wall steel towers are light and can easily overturn if used incorrectly. Towers rely on all parts being in place to ensure adequate strength. They can collapse if sections are left out.

Before selecting or specifying a tower, you must be satisfied that it is the most suitable item of equipment for the job.

www.facelift.co.uk/training/aluminium-towers-training

Download ()

MEWPs Training User Guide

This guide sets out recommended working practices for the safe operation of a wide range of mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs) to include pre-use inspections, transport and positioning. The guidance will enable an operator
to carry out the required task with
safety and efficiency.

MEWPs Covered in this guide
1a - Static Vertical e.g. Vertical personnel platforms
1b - Static Boom e.g. Vehicle and trailer mounted platforms
3a - Mobile Vertical e.g. Scissor lifts
3b - Mobile Boom e.g. Self propelled booms

Download (PDF 1.5Mb)

Best Practice Guidance for MEWPs    Avoiding Trapping / Crushing Injuries to   People in the Platform

Best Practice Guidance for MEWPs Avoiding Trapping / Crushing Injuries to People in the Platform

A mobile elevating work platform (often referred to as a MEWP) saves time and makes work at height
efficient, effective and safer than using traditional methods of access. When used safely, MEWPs
significantly reduce the risk of injuries through falling from height.

Unfortunately over the past few years a significant number of accidents involving the use of MEWPs
have occurred, including tragically fatalities. Some of these incidents have involved the operator or other
person being crushed against fixtures or other obstacles while accessing their work area, or while
working at height. The incidents could have been prevented by correct planning and preparation,
selection of appropriate machinery and proper use.

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Powered Access Guide 2009

Cherry Picker Hire - Access Platform Guide 2010

Click to download a copy of our access guide. With over 40 different powered platforms and information on IPAF and PASMA training courses. To receive your own 84-page full colour brochure, simply go to the contact page and send us your details.

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Facelift Access Platform Safety Poster

Facelift Access Platform Safety Poster

Please download, print and place in your site office. We can provide IPAF Operator training and Harness user inspection training, please see the training section for more information, or call our training section directly on 01444 88 11 66.

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Facelift Safety Harness Poster

Facelift Clunk Click Safety Harness Poster

Please download, print and place in your site office. We can provide IPAF Operator training and Harness user inspection training, please see the training section for more information, or call our training section directly on 01444 88 11 66.

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The selection and management of mobile elevating work platforms

This document is aimed at those responsible for selecting, specifying and managing MEWP's on site.

Click below to download.

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Rough Terrain Hire Fleet July 2008

As the latest addition to our rough terrain fleet the Haulotte 12DX will work in the most difficult of site conditions. To see more about our rough terrain fleet click to download

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MEWP's for Managers Training COurse

A one day training course for anyone who manages, organises, supervises or plans the use of Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPS) with the information they require to work and act in a safe and professional manner.

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MEWPS for Managers Traing Course Details 2008

An important training programme to instruct a supervisor/manager
what is required to prepare for and safely co-ordinate various types
of Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs) within their control.

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Preventing falls from boom-type mobile elevating

This information sheet explains how to prevent falls, not just mitigate the effects once a fall occurs. It also explains how to select suitable fall protection equipment where the risk cannot be adequately
controlled.

Click to download

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Autumn 2007 Access Guide

This is a downloadable version of our latest access guide with the full range of access platforms for hire. The guide also contains information on training courses for MEWPs and towers. The full colour 84 page guide has all the information you need when hiring access equipment in the UK.

Simply click on the image to start downloading

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Clunk Click Poster

The A3 Clunk Click Poster artwork is available here to download. For versions in Danish, Finnish and German please contact marketing@facelift.co.uk

Click below to download the English version.

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Technical Notes published by IPAF and CPA regarding harness use with Mobile Elevating Work Platforms. Click here to download your copy.

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Facelift Operators' Guide

This is a 46 page Operators' guide produced by facelift with the permission of the CPA. This booklet is essential for anyone looking to, or currently using Mobile Elevating Work Platforms. Click here to download your copy or a hard copy is available on request.

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Cranes & Planes

Cranes-and-Planes A guide to Procedures for Operation of Cranes in vicinity of Aerodromes.

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5-Steps-to-Risk-Assessment

This is the revised version of the booklet first published in 1993. It has been updated and simplified to make it easier for all business people to use. Just click to download your copy.

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Ladder Guide PDF

Safe use of Ladders and Stepladders, an employers guide. Simply click to download a copy of the HSE document

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Toolbox Talk

A 12 page guide on Ladder Leaning and Stepladder Safety publised by the HSE.

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IPAF & CPA Harness Press Release

IPAF & CPA Press Release
Safety Harnesses in Mobile Elevation Work Platforms and HSE Information Leaflet

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A Brief Guide to Working at Height Regulations 2005

The Work at Height Regulation 2005. Click to download a copy of the 12 page guide.

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Top Tips Cover

Pocket-sized booklet full of safety tips for ladders and step ladders.

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MEWPS and Tree Work

Use and Effectiveness of Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPS) for tree work. Click to download the full report.

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Inspecting Equipment Cover

Click to download the full 20 page booklet. Guiding you to the requirments for Inspecting fall arrest equipment made of webbing or rope. Published by the HSE.

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Height Safe

Essential Health and Safety information for people Working at Height

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Hightimes August 2005

Click to download Issue 101

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A Guide to Risk Assessment Requirments

An eight page guide to risk assessment requirements. A look at common provisions in health and safety law, produced by the HSE. Click to download your copy.

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An Introduction to Health & Safety

Health and Safety in a small business, what you should know about and where to get more information. Click here to download the 36 page guide.

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Avoiding Falls from Vehicles

A handy sized leaflet on how to avoid falling from vehicles. Click here to download.

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Construction Fire Safety

A HSE factsheet on construction fire safety. Click to download this essential information

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Crossing high-speed roads on foot during tempory traffic management. An information sheet produced by the HSE, click here to read more.

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Directors' responsibilities for Health and Safety within an organization. A 12 page booklet about what you need to know and where to find additional information.

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Five Steps to Risk Assessment - a step by step guide to planning your risk assessment. Click here to download your copy.

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A HSE published information sheet on general access scaffolds and ladders.

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Health and Safety Training-What you need to know. This leaflet explains the importance of health and safety training to owners and managers of businesses. It gives advice on who may need training, what form the training may take and how to organise it.

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Hiring and leasing out of plant: application of PUWER 98, regulations 26 and 27. A HSE information sheet for those that hire, lease or lend mobile work equipment.

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Issues surrounding the failure of an energy absorbing lanyard, written by David Thomas. Published by the HSE this 112 page report is essential reading for those using harnesses in the workplace.

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Mobile Elevating Work Platforms for tree work. A handy sized booklet full of information for when working with MEWPs and references for further information.

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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Safety Helmets. An information sheet published by the HSE

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Safety in window cleaning using suspended and powered access equipment. An information sheet from the HSE for those working at height in this way. Click to download your copy of the document.

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Safety in window cleaning using portable ladders. An information sheet published by the HSE, click to learn more.

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A short guide to the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992. A full colour guide to PPE and references to further regulations.

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Simple guide to the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998. An 8 page booklet published by the HSE for a basic understanding of LOLER.

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Simple Guide to the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulation 1998. An 8 page guide to the aspects of PUWER published by the HSE. Click to download your copy.

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Tower Scaffolds, a 4 page lnformation sheet published by the HSE. Click here to learn more.

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Using Work Equipment Safely - A 16 page full colour guide published by the HSE. Click here to download a copy of the booklet

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Working on Roofs - an information sheet covering the crucial issues to be concerned about when working in this environment. Published by the HSE, to learn more click here.

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Workplace Transport Safety - An Overview

Published by the HSE this 22 page booklet is designed to raise awareness of current dangers with transport in the workplace. Click here to see the whole document.

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HSE Information sheet on Inspection and Reports, click here to download your copy.

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Evidence base for identifying potential failures in the specification, use and maintenance of PPE at work. This is a 58 page report prepared by Bomel Ltd for the HSE, click to download your copy.

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The HSE Site Safe News Letter with a features concerned with working at height. Click to download your copy.

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LOLER: how the Regulations apply to agriculture, a HSE information worksheet , click to download.

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LOLER: How the Regulations apply to arboriculture. Click to download your copy of this HSE information sheet.

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Protect your hearing or lose it, an 8 page booklet published by the HSE, click here to download your copy.

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LOLER: How the regulations apply to forestry. Click here to see more and download your own copy.

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Preventing falls from height in the food and drink industries. A 4 page booklet published by the HSE.

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Tackling stress: The Management Standards approach. A booklet produced by the HSE regarding work place stress, click here to download.

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Working safely near overhead power lines, an HSE booklet. Click here to find out more.

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Preventing falls from fragile roofs in agriculture. An information sheet published by the HSE, click here to download

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Working alone in safety. A HSE booklet that highlights the issues surrounding solitary work and controlling the risks. Cleck here to download your copy.

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Shock Horror - Safe working near overhead power lines in agriculture. A 23 page colour booklet published by the HSE, click here to download your free copy.

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Why fall for it ? Preventing falls in agriculture. A 15 page full colour booklet published by the HSE. Click here to download your copy.

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Safe working on glass house roofs, a HSE publication, click here to download.

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